Mecca Moore, Creator of Pynk Magazine

My name is Mecca Moore and I am Black American woman. Like, a regular Black girl! It’s so funny because [I’ll hear] a lot of people always trying to say, “I’m part this or I’m part that.” No. I’m a good ole’ Black girl. My family is from the South, mostly in North Carolina and South Carolina.

My grandmother’s family was in between North Carolina and Atlanta. Then my grandmother came here, so my mother has kind of been here her whole life. She lived in the Bronx, Brooklyn and Queens, and I grew up in Long Island.

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I own a magazine named Pynk, which is a woman’s lifestyle publication. Our tag line is “Pretty Powerful and Provocative”. We represent the independent, fly woman that is about uplifting and inspiring other Black women.

I chose the name Pynk because, all girls love pink. Well, kind of. My favorite color secretly is purple, but whatever. Nobody wanted a magazine named Purple [laughs]!

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I’m not really a beauty girl, but people do somewhat know me by my hair. It’s for sure become a big part of my brand. To be honest, I’m tired of this hair…but I think that my hair is a huge part of my brand and myself. It’s become a part of my strength and it does help people identify me. A lot of the other girls are really into makeup. I haven’t quite figured that out yet. But all Pynk girls have their own signature look. Everyone’s very different. I think what we all have in common is our independence, our drive and our need to want to do more. We have a need to inspire other women to have that same drive and that same level of independence.

There are so many different negative versions of what it looks like to be a Black woman. Our objective is to continue to put out good visuals and good examples of what it looks like [to be a Black woman].

I try not to water the brand down. I want people to be very clear of what the message is and I don’t want the message to get lost.

It’s been a process with people really respecting the movement and even respecting me as a boss. As a young Black woman, it’s been difficult. But I think everybody gets it now.

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The Pynk Power Dinner Movement is actually how the brand was launched. It’s a magazine and we started Pynk in a down market for publishing. So, we had to figure out creative ways to be able to create the capital for the magazine. Brands weren’t comfortable with just buying ads. We had to create this whole 360 experience and the dinner parties were a way for us to not only connect with our peers, media influencers, and tastemakers, but also giving us an opportunity to honor someone who has been very active within our community or industry.

Pynk is a life that we live. There is no off switch. Everything is a Pynk thing because that’s what it’s about.

We have some new initiatives – Pynk Girls Travel – and we have Pynk Girls Care. There’s so much work to be done. It’s been three years now. But we have so far to go and I want to stay. Some of my favorite magazines aren’t here anymore – Honey and Suede and even Vibe Vixen. I loved them. I still look at their visuals and hold copies to really see how fly we were as a people back then. Like, I want to be that. I want to be a part of that elite. Like when people reference magazines for multicultural women, I want to be a part of that conversation.

Three years ago, we did this thing with Michaela Angela Davis and her word was: “It’s a good time to be a woman. It’s a good time to be a Black woman and it’s a good time to be a Black woman with vision.” And I think anyone who’s willing to live by that is setting themselves up to succeed.

It’s a good time to embrace being a Brown girl and being like a cool Brown girl. Being a positive brown girl, like it’s a good time for all of that. I don’t want to miss this while we’re here because it took us a minute to get here.  If we all can just join this movement, as cool Brown girls, we’ll stay here.